For Hospitals

Learn More About Our Professional Partnerships

Hospitals, nurses and staff are a critical component of our ability to support our donor families and recipients. By working together to make donation an everyday conversation, we can begin to turn the tide of organ donation in favor of the people who so desperately need them. We all know the difference a single donation can make, both to the donor’s family and to that of the recipient. By working together with hospitals, transplant centers, tissue processors, funeral directors, and medical examiners, we can all save more lives.

    • FOR DOCTORS

      • Clinical Triggers for Organ Donation

        • Call Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 before any family discussion of DNR, comfort care, or ventilator withdrawal, if your patient is:

          • Ventilated
          • Suffering a devastating illness or injury, and
          • Lost three or more brainstem reflexes (pupils fixed, no corneal reflex, no cough, no gag, no response to painful stimuli, no spontaneous respirations).

          *Hypothermic cooling protocols likely meet clinical triggers.

      • Clinical Triggers for Tissue or Cornea Donation

        • Call Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 to report all cardiac deaths within 60 minutes—even if the patient was ruled out for organ donation.

          For care of a cornea donor: eyelids shuts, saline soaked gauze on eyelids, elevate head. For more information contact our Ocular recovery partner: Miracles in Sight

      • Three Ways Doctors Can Promote Positive Donation Outcomes

          • Keep the option of donation viable. Support the patient to maintain stability and organ viability, per CMS regulation (482.45 Conditions of Participation). See below for more on preserving your patient’s opportunity to donate.
          • Ensure that declaration of brain death is always performed in compliance with your hospital’s brain death policy.
          • Collaborate with our team regarding the donation conversation. Communicate proactively with our donation coordinator regarding the family conference plan, DNR, and brain death testing. Close collaboration can lead to more positive conversations with families.
      • Preserving Your Patient’s Opportunity to Donate

        • Donation can give hope to families and provide assurance that a patient’s wishes were honored. Donation also gives you and your team the opportunity to save some of the 22 people who die everyday waiting for a transplant. Without you, that opportunity can easily be lost. Saving a life through donation isn’t possible without an invested hospital care team.

          Keep three things in mind to preserve your patient’s opportunity to donate:

          • What is good for the patient is good for the donor. Doing everything you can to help your patient will also help preserve their opportunity to donate.
          • Remind your care team about the Donor Management Goals: SBP (>90) or MAP (>60), PCWP (8-12), CVP (4-12), Pressors (≤1 pressor and Dopa<10, Neo<60, Norepi<10). Sodium (≤155), Glucose (≤200), pH(7.30-7.50), pO2 (>100 on ≤40 FiO2), Urine output (0.5-7.0 cc/hr/kg), Platelets >50. Consider changing MIVF to ½ NS to maintain Sodium levels. Don’t make assumptions about who can be a donor. Many situations that might have ruled out donation in the past no longer apply. Let us help determine donor suitability.
          • Communicating with Families Clearly and Compassionately. Delivering a grave prognosis to a family is an extremely difficult task for anyone, including physicians. You are a professional devoted to saving lives, and giving this heartbreaking news can be overwhelming. We want you to know that we’re here to provide our support and experience in these situations—to help you treat your patient and their family with respect and compassion.

          Here are four things to keep in mind that have been helpful to other doctors in these situations:

          • Don’t discuss donation before or during the delivery of a grave prognosis. Because delivering a grave prognosis is so difficult, it can be natural to want to say something positive as well, such as the potential of helping others through donation. However, this often isn’t the best time to begin this conversation, since families naturally hold onto any evidence of hope at this very difficult moment. For example, a family that is told “there is not much hope” hears “there is still some hope.” If all interventions have been tried and have not worked, and there is nothing else that can be done, the family needs time to understand that.
          • Take a timeout. The family must have time and space to absorb this tragic news before they receive additional end-of-life information. If donation is mentioned to a family prior to this “close-ended” news, they might conclude that the care team has quit trying—that they are more concerned about recovering organs and tissues. The family must have complete confidence that all medical interventions have been attempted to extend the patient’s life. Anything less plants seeds of doubt and mistrust.
          • Create a plan with Sharing Hope SC. We know that when families understand the good that can come from donation, they rarely say no. But donation information must be delivered in a respectful, time-sensitive manner—and with a unified approach and support from the care team and Sharing Hope SC. We all owe that to the grieving family and to the thousands of people currently waiting for an organ, eye, or tissue transplant. That’s why it’s so important to call Sharing Hope SC 800-269-9777 early, before beginning the donation conversation. Together, we can work to help your patient’s family find comfort in a difficult time.
          • Communicate with respect and clarity. When the time does come to discuss donation, many physicians have told us that it’s sometimes helpful to keep it simple. Below are some basic tips that have helped other physicians in these situations:

          Recognize the sadness of the situation when telling a family their loved one is dead or dying:

          • “I am very sorry to tell you this.”
          • “I wish I could tell you something different.”
          • “This is a horrible situation.”

          Let the family know that it’s okay to feel like the news is unexpected or shocking:

          • “I imagine when you woke up this morning you didn’t expect to be here today.”
          • “This can be very overwhelming.”

          Realize that a family in shock may not understand brain death or the need for comfort care, regardless of their level of education:

          • “It can be hard to understand because she looks like she is sleeping, but her brain has lost all function.”
          • “The time of her final brain death exam is her legal time of death.”
          • “He is not in a coma.”
          • “Sometimes even if it makes sense in our head it is hard to understand or believe in our heart.”

          Make sure the family knows they have permission to slow down:

          • “This is a lot to absorb.”
          • “Talk to your friends and family about this.”
          • “We have time.”
          • “Take some time and get a cup of coffee.”
          • “There are more things to talk about…why don’t you take a break and we can reconvene later.”

          Recognize that if donation comes up too soon and a family reacts negatively, they may be saying “no” to the death and not to donation—so it’s okay to leave the conversation open-ended:

          • “The decision to donate is a very important one; someone will be in to talk to you in more depth about it soon.”
          • “Now may not be the right time to decide whether or not donation is right for her, why don’t you take some time to be with your family and sit with her. Someone will check in with you in about an hour.”
          • Keep three things in mind to preserve your patient’s opportunity to donate:

            1. What is good for the patient is good for the donor. Doing everything you can to help your patient will also help preserve their opportunity to donate.
            2. Remind your care team about the Donor Management Goals: SBP (>90) or MAP (>60), PCWP (8-12), CVP (4-12), Pressors (≤1 pressor and Dopa<10, Neo<60, Norepi<10).  Sodium (≤155), Glucose (≤200), pH(7.30-7.50), pO2 (>100 on ≤40 FiO2), Urine output (0.5-7.0 cc/hr/kg), Platelets >50. Consider changing MIVF to ½ NS to maintain Sodium levels. Don’t make assumptions about who can be a donor. Many situations that might have ruled out donation in the past no longer apply. Let us help determine donor suitability
            3. Communicating with Families Clearly and Compassionately. Delivering a grave prognosis to a family is an extremely difficult task for anyone, including physicians. You are a professional devoted to saving lives, and giving this heartbreaking news can be overwhelming. We want you to know that we’re here to provide our support and experience in these situations—to help you treat your patient and their family with respect and compassion.
          • Here are four things to keep in mind that have been helpful to other doctors in these situations:

            • Don’t discuss donation before or during the delivery of a grave prognosis. Because delivering a grave prognosis is so difficult, it can be natural to want to say something positive as well, such as the potential of helping others through donation. However, this often isn’t the best time to begin this conversation, since families naturally hold onto any evidence of hope at this very difficult moment. For example, a family that is told “there is not much hope” hears “there is still some hope.” If all interventions have been tried and have not worked, and there is nothing else that can be done, the family needs time to understand that.
            • Take a timeout. The family must have time and space to absorb this tragic news before they receive additional end-of-life information. If donation is mentioned to a family prior to this “close-ended” news, they might conclude that the care team has quit trying—that they are more concerned about recovering organs and tissues. The family must have complete confidence that all medical interventions have been attempted to extend the patient’s life. Anything less plants seeds of doubt and mistrust.
            • Create a plan with Sharing Hope SC. We know that when families understand the good that can come from donation, they rarely say no. But donation information must be delivered in a respectful, time-sensitive manner—and with a unified approach and support from the care team and Sharing Hope SC. We all owe that to the grieving family and to the thousands of people currently waiting for an organ, eye, or tissue transplant. That’s why it’s so important to call Sharing Hope SC 800-269-9777 early, before beginning the donation conversation. Together, we can work to help your patient’s family find comfort in a difficult time.
              • Communicate with respect and clarity. When the time does come to discuss donation, many physicians have told us that it’s sometimes helpful to keep it simple. Below are some basic tips that have helped other physicians in these situations:
                • Recognize the sadness of the situation when telling a family their loved one is dead or dying:
                  • “I am very sorry to tell you this.”
                  • “I wish I could tell you something different.”
                  • “This is a horrible situation.”
                • Let the family know that it’s okay to feel like the news is unexpected or shocking:
                  • “I imagine when you woke up this morning you didn’t expect to be here today.”
                  • “This can be very overwhelming.”
                • Realize that a family in shock may not understand brain death or the need for comfort care, regardless of their level of education:
                  • “It can be hard to understand because she looks like she is sleeping, but her brain has lost all function.”
                  • “The time of her final brain death exam is her legal time of death.”
                  • “He is not in a coma.”
                  • “Sometimes even if it makes sense in our head it is hard to understand or believe in our heart.”
                • Make sure the family knows they have permission to slow down:
                  • “This is a lot to absorb.”
                  • “Talk to your friends and family about this.”
                  • “We have time.”
                  • “Take some time and get a cup of coffee.”
                  • “There are more things to talk about… why don’t you take a break and we can reconvene later.”
                    • Recognize that if donation comes up too soon and a family reacts negatively, they may be saying “no” to the death and not to donation—so it’s okay to leave the conversation open-ended:
                    • “The decision to donate is a very important one; someone will be in to talk to you in more depth about it soon.”
                    • “Now may not be the right time to decide whether or not donation is right for her, why don’t you take some time to be with your family and sit with her. Someone will check in with you in about an hour.”
      • Online Course: Death by Neurological Criteria

        • The Cleveland Clinic, with support from the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations (AOPO), has created a free online course to assist physicians in diagnosing Death by Neurological Criteria (DNC). The course is designated for 1.00 AMA PRA category 1 credit and covers:

          • Methods for assessing evidence of cerebral function in comatose patients
          • Outlines of accepted medical standards for determining DNC
          • Descriptions and videos illustrating effective diagnosis of DNC
          • Guidance for discussion of DNC with the family of patients

          On your first visit, click “Create New Account,” (http://www.cchs.net/onlinelearning/cometvs10/dncPortal/default.htm) complete registration, and click the “Log In” button to begin course. You may stop at any time and finish the course later by logging in again.

      • Donor Designation and the Law

        • Families are usually relieved to find out that their loved one has already declared their wishes with regard to donation, and that the decision has already been made. Families often feel an ethical duty to honor the expressed wishes of their loved one—since giving the gift of life to others, whatever their values or motive, may have been very important to the donor.

          In some cases, however, families may question their loved one’s designation and at that point state laws must be followed so that neither Sharing Hope SC (LCNW) nor your hospital can be held legally responsible for not honoring the patient’s designated wishes.

          Below are some of the relevant regulations, but contact our Hospital Development team if you want more information on the legal issues surrounding donation. In general, we have found that in many cases when families question their loved one’s wishes, they just needed better timing or more information.

          For example:

          • Donation was raised too early with the family. Giving the family time will usually help them understand.
          • Someone has set an expectation with the family that authorizing donation is a decision they need to make. Avoid language that indicates they have a decision to make.
          • Families may have misconceptions about donation. Be thorough and respectful in addressing the family’s concerns.
          • Family is surprised that their loved one didn’t tell them. Help the family understand that it is not unusual for individuals to not discuss death with their family.

          Donor designation is a documented, legally binding commitment by an individual to make an anatomical gift—and just like a will or testament, it can only be revoked by that individual. Here is a link to the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) for SC: www.scstatehouse.gov/sess118_2009-2010/bills/407.htm

    • GUIDANCE FOR NURSES

      • Clinical Triggers for Organ Donation

        • Call Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 before any family discussion of DNR, comfort care, or ventilator withdrawal, if your patient is:

          • Ventilated
          • Suffered a devastating illness or injury, and
          • Lost three or more brainstem reflexes (pupils fixed, no corneal reflex, no cough, no gag, no response to painful stimuli, no spontaneous respirations).
          • HIPAA Exemption: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) PDF
      • Clinical Triggers for Tissue or Cornea Donation

        • Call Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 to report all cardiac deaths within 60 minutes—even if the patient was ruled out for organ donation.

          For care of a cornea donor: eyelids shuts, saline soaked gauze on eyelids, elevate head. For more information contact our Ocular recovery partner: Miracles in Sight

      • Preserving your patient’s opportunity to donate

        • Donation can give hope to families—and provide assurance that a patient’s wishes were honored.

          Donation also gives you and your team the opportunity to save some of the 22 people who die everyday waiting for a transplant. Without you, that opportunity can easily be lost. Saving a life through donation isn’t possible without an invested hospital care team.

          Keep three things in mind to preserve your patient’s opportunity to donate:

          • What is good for the patient is good for the donor. Doing everything you can to help your patient will also help preserve their opportunity to donate.
          • Remind your care team about the Donor Management Goals: SBP (>90) or MAP (>60), PCWP (8-12), CVP (4-12), Pressors (≤1 pressor and Dopa<10, Neo<60, Norepi<10). Sodium (≤155), Glucose (≤200), pH(7.30-7.50), pO2 (>100 on ≤40 FiO2), Urine output (0.5-7.0 cc/hr/kg), Platelets >50. Consider changing MIVF to ½ NS to maintain Sodium levels.
          • Don’t make assumptions about who can be a donor. Many situations that might have ruled out donation in the past no longer apply. Let us help determine donor suitability.
      • Critical Pathway for Donation after Brain Death

        • This critical pathway provides a detailed, step-by-step description of the donation process after brain death.

          • Patient meets clinical triggers for donation. (Patient has been ventilated, suffered a devastating illness or injury, and lost two or more brainstem reflexes—i.e., pupils fixed, no corneal reflex, no cough, no gag, no response to painful stimuli, no spontaneous respirations.)
          • Hospital staff calls Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 when triggers are met, before any family discussion of DNR, comfort care, or withdrawal of ventilator.
          • A Sharing Hope SC Family Support Counselor (FSC) will arrive on site and determine if the patient is a suitable candidate for donation.
          • The Sharing Hope SC FSC works with the patient care team on a plan for talking to the family about brain injury, brain death and donation.
          • The Sharing Hope SC FSC facilitates the donation conversation with the family. If the patient is Donor Designated (i.e., registered as an organ donor), this serves as authorization and the family is provided with full disclosure. If the patient is not registered, family authorization is obtained.
          • Patient is maintained on a ventilator in the ICU for donor management and organ allocation.
          • Family is provided time to say good-bye.
          • Patient is transferred to the OR for organ recovery.
      • Critical Pathway for Donation after Circulatory Death

        • This critical pathway provides a detailed, step-by-step description of the donation process after circulatory death.

          • Patient meets clinical triggers for donation. (Patient has been ventilated, suffered a devastating illness or injury, and lost two or more brainstem reflexes—i.e., pupils fixed, no corneal reflex, no cough, no gag, no response to painful stimuli, no spontaneous respirations.)
          • Hospital staff calls Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 before any family discussion of DNR, comfort care, or withdrawal of ventilator.
          • A Sharing Hope SC Family Support Counselor begins potential donor evaluation.
          • If a neurological exam is not consistent with brain death, physician and family have discussion about withdrawal of life support as an appropriate option.
          • If patient is determined to be a suitable candidate for donation, the Sharing Hope SC coordinator works with the patient care team on a plan for talking to the family about donation.
          • The Sharing Hope SC coordinator facilitates the donation conversation with the family.
          • Patient is maintained by the hospital during evaluation as a donor after circulatory death.
      • Planning to Talk About Donation with Families

        • We know that when families understand the good that can come from donation, they rarely say no. But donation information must be delivered in a respectful, time-sensitive manner—and with a unified approach and support from the care team and Sharing Hope SC. We all owe that to the grieving family and to the thousands of people currently waiting for an organ, eye, or tissue transplant.

          That’s why it’s so important to call Sharing Hope SC at 800-269-9777 before beginning the donation conversation with the family. You are knowledgeable about your hospital policy and your patient’s family and medical information, and we are experienced and confident with the donation process and working with donor families.

          Together, we can work to help your patient’s family find comfort in a difficult time.

          Who should be involved in the planning:

          • The hospital care team:
            • physician leading the family conferences and writing orders for the patient
            • bedside nurse
            • hospital staff specific to family support (including social work, spiritual care, palliative care) anyone who has interacted with the family and has knowledge to share
          • The Sharing Hope SC team:
            • family support counselor
            • organ recovery coordinator
            • hospital development coordinator, if appropriate

          What should be determined:

          • What is the family’s understanding of the prognosis/diagnosis?
          • Who are the key members of the family making decisions?
          • Has there been any previous mention or discussion of donation? If so, was it positive or negative?
          • Is the patient a registered donor?
          • Are there any complex family dynamics?
          • How long has the patient/family been in the hospital?
          • Does the age and injury of the patient have any effect on the conversation?
          • Who will introduce the donation coordinators to the family?
          • What is good language for introducing the coordinator?

          When and where planning should occur:

          After you call Sharing Hope SC, planning for the family conversation should be ongoing. Planning is most critical just before introducing the donation coordinators to the family. To be respectful, planning should take place away from the family, in a private space on the unit or near the nurse’s station.

    • GUIDANCE FOR HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION

      • Promoting a Culture of Donation

        • The ideas below can help you spread a donation culture beyond the ICU. For more ideas, or to share what has worked at your hospital, contact our Hospital Development team.

          Public Relations

          • Install a “Wall of Hope” display honoring organ and tissue donors
          • Fly a donation flag at your hospital
          • Feature donation stories in your hospital newsletter, website, and on social media sites
          • Place registry brochures in key areas to inspire employees, colleagues, and the public to learn more about donation
          • Pitch a donation story to your local media outlets
          • Host a donation celebration at your hospital

          Volunteer Services

          • Spearhead a volunteer group to run a “Donation Heroes Quilt” program at your hospital
          • Initiate a thank you card project for donor families

          Human Resources

          • Include donation registry brochures in your new employee benefits packages
          • Highlight your center’s commitment to donation at new employee orientation
          • Link to donation information on your internal website
          • Honor employee connections to donation in your employee newsletter
          • Establish an employee award for excellence in donation
      • Compliance Checklist

        • The following checklist can help you be compliant before Joint Commission, Health Department, CMS, and other audits.

          • Current contract signed and on file with We Are Sharing Hope SC for organ and tissue recovery, or with another tissue agency, and an eye recovery organization.
          • Updated policy and procedure to reflect referral of all deaths and imminent deaths (no age limits) to the Donor Referral Line.
          • Donor referral number easily accessible and correct. Our referral number is 800-269-9777.
          • List of referrals called to the donor referral number. We can provide this annually or upon request, contact our Hospital Development team.
          • Record of death form has a place for referral documentation.
          • Documentation of staff education on file. All patient care staff educated on policies and procedures related to organ, tissue, and eye donation.
      • Rapid Process Improvement Checklist

        • The checklist below outlines ways you can improve the donation process at your hospital and ensure an early donor referral call every time.

          • Make sure clinical triggers are clearly visible in the ICU and ER
          • Include clinical triggers in ICU and ER orientation materials
          • Provide ongoing nursing education regarding clinical triggers
          • Provide ongoing physician education regarding clinical triggers
          • Consistently follow up and analyze each late referral
          • Keep the option for donation viable
          • Educate physicians on the importance of preserving the patient’s donation opportunity
          • Appoint a physician champion to serve as a resource for other physicians and a communication liaison to We Are Sharing Hope SC
          • Include donation education in physician orientation
          • Host case reviews on clinically challenging potential donor patients
          • Ensure physicians are well trained on declaration of brain death
          • Make certain families are supported and approached appropriately
          • Implement a team approach on every potential donor
          • Conduct timeouts with We Are Sharing Hope SC prior to donation approach
          • Implement a system to ensure a multidisciplinary plan prior to each donation conversation
          • Target education for the hospital care team regarding separation of the grave prognosis and the donation conversation
          • Include team approach best practices in orientation materials for ICU and ER
          • Review process improvement when any family is approached where best practices were not followed
          • Review quality regularly to measure improvement
          • Review compliant referral rate monthly
          • Review conversion rate monthly
          • Review effective request rate after each request
          • Review organs transplanted per donor after each organ donor
      • Donor Designation and the Law

        • Families are usually relieved to find out that their loved one has already declared their wishes with regard to donation, and that the decision has already been made. Families often feel an ethical duty to honor the expressed wishes of their loved one—since giving the gift of life to others, whatever their values or motive, may have been very important to the donor.

          If a patient is not a registered donor the donation decision falls to their Legal Next of Kin (LNOK). There is a LNOK decision-making hierarchy in every state. We Are Sharing Hope SC and the hospital will always follow the hierarchy outlined by the state where the hospital is located.

          In some cases families may question their loved one’s designation, and at that point state laws must be followed so that neither We Are Sharing Hope SC nor your hospital can be held legally responsible for not honoring the patient’s designated wishes.

          Below are some of the relevant regulations, but contact our Hospital Development team if you want more information on the legal issues surrounding donation. In general, we have found that in many cases when families question their loved one’s wishes, they just needed better timing or more information. For example:

          • Donation was raised too early with the family. Giving the family time will usually help them understand.
          • Someone has set an expectation with the family that authorizing donation is a decision they need to make. Avoid language that indicates they have a decision to make.
          • Families may have misconceptions about donation. Be thorough and respectful in addressing the family’s concerns.
          • Family is surprised that their loved one didn’t tell them. Help the family understand that it is not unusual for individuals not to discuss death with their family.

          Donor designation is a documented, legally binding commitment by an individual to make an anatomical gift—and just like a will or testament, it can only be revoked by that individual.

          Here is a link to the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) for SC: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess118_2009-2010/bills/407.htm

      • Conditions of Participation for Organ and Tissue Donation

        • What are the Conditions of Participation (COP)?

          COP is a Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulation that health care organizations must meet in order to begin and continue participating in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. These health and safety standards are the foundation for improving quality and protecting the health and safety of beneficiaries. The COP that covers organ and tissue donation is intended to increase organ donation and save lives.

          All hospitals that receive Medicare reimbursement must identify and refer all deaths and imminent deaths to the Donor Referral Line (for We Are Sharing Hope SC, 800-269-9777).

          Key Points:

          The COP requires hospitals to:

          • Notify the designated Donor Referral Line of all individuals who have died or whose death is imminent. “Imminent death” is defined as a severely neurologically injured ventilator dependent patient with either a Glasgow Coma Score
          • Ensure the family of each potential donor is informed of their option to donate by a donation agency coordinator or trained designated requestor.
          • Continue to apply discretion and sensitivity with respect to circumstances, views, and beliefs of the families of potential donors.
          • Have an agreement with the designated organ procurement organization and at least one tissue and eye bank
          • Maintain a cooperative working relationship with the donation agencies for:
            • education of staff on donation issues
            • review of death records to improve identification of potential donors
            • maintaining potential donors

          Does this mean every family will be approached with the option of donation?

          Not necessarily. All referral calls are to be placed to the Donor Referral Line prior to approaching the family to evaluate medical suitability. This process ensures that families will only be approached with the appropriate options. For example, if the patient is unable to donate, there is no need to approach the next-of-kin. If donation is an option, the donation agency will facilitate approaching the family. The referral call and outcome must be documented in the patient chart.

          Does this mean that all patient deaths must be reported to the Donor Referral Line, despite age?

          Yes. All deaths and imminent deaths must be referred to the Donor Referral Line despite age and medical/social history. Calls are to be placed on all ventilated patients prior to withdrawal of support to preserve the option of organ donation.

    • HOSPITAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM

      • Sharing Hope SC maintains a close, collaborative relationship with more than 60 hospitals throughout South Carolina to help define, shape and guide their roles in the donation process.

        An important part of this ongoing effort is Sharing Hope SC’s professional hospital development staff, known as Hospital Development Coordinators. Each works with more than 10 hospitals in their assigned area of the state to ensure that the hospital staffs understand the need for donation as well as the hospital’s legal compliance obligations and the best processes they should follow in order to honor someone’s wish to donate.

Share the hope for life by becoming an organ & tissue donor.

1.800.462.0755|3950 Faber Pl Dr Suite 400, North Charleston, SC 29405

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